shoulder joint.jpg

1. This shows the anatomy of the shoulder joint, including the tendons of the rotator cuff.

640px-Rotator_cuff_tear.jpg

2. This shows a rotator cuff tear.

640px-2018-10-11_Snatch_(Weightlifting_Girls'_58kg)_at_2018_Summer_Youth_Olympics_by_Sandr

3. Repetitive overhead sports like put one at a greater risk of rotator cuff injuries.

Rotator Cuff

The Basics

The rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons in the shoulder that are needed for function and stability. The cuff can be injured partially, completely, or gradually wear down over time. 

Tearing the cuff can also be caused through repetitive overhead motion, which can come from anything from sports to work. Its symptoms include pain, loss of function, and weakness. A common complication of rotator cuff injury is frozen shoulder. Treatment for injuring the cuff includes physical therapy, medication, lifestyle changes, steroids, and surgery if other treatments fail. After surgery, the recovery for this injury includes a sling for 4-6 weeks

 

 

Often times, a shoulder with rotator cuff tendonitis, tendinosis, or other inflammatory conditions may result in a rotator cuff tear.

Sources
Attribution for Images

1. OpenStax College. “Shoulder Joint”. Wikimedia Commons, 19 May 2013, https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:914_Shoulder_Joint.jpg.

2. Nucleus Communications www.nucleusinc.com. “Rotator cuff tear”. Wikimedia Commons, 3 December 2018, https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Rotator_cuff_tear.jpg.

3. Sandro Halank. “2018-10-11 Snatch (Weightlifting Girls' 58kg) at 2018 Summer Youth Olympics by Sandro Halank”. Wikimedia Commons, 11 October 2018, https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:2018-10-11_Snatch_(Weightlifting_Girls%27_58kg)_at_2018_Summer_Youth_Olympics_by_Sandro_Halank%E2%80%93118.jpg.